October 27, 2015

Oct. 27

October 27, 2015:  Tuesday, 30th week, Ordinary Time



  • 'Holy Spirit' chain:  We have the first fruits of the Spirit (1st reading)

  • 'Tree' pin:  Mustard bush (gospel)
  • 'Birds' tie:  The birds dwelt in the bush's branches (gospel)


  • Green shirt:  Ordinary Time season
Listen

  • Rom 8:18-25  Today's sufferings are nothing compared with glory to be revealed.  Creation eagerly awaits the freedom of God's children.  We groan as we wait in hope for adoption, redemption.  If we hope, we wait with endurance.
  • Ps 126:1b-6  "The Lord has done marvels for us."  Sow in tears; reap rejoicing.  Go forth weeping; come back rejoicing.
  • Lk 13:18-21  God's Kingdom is like a mustard seed that became a large bush birds dwelt in; it's like yeast mixed with flour till all the dough was leavened.


Reflect
    • Creighton:  Today’s readings focus on hope and faith.  I can’t imagine a day without relying on God who provides my hope and faith.  Paul reminds us that this world's sufferings pale in comparison to future glory.  What we endure will seem so small in the light of the reward.  We await creation's being set free to share in the freedom of God's children.  Hope is looking forward with belief and conviction; it's closely connected with trust.  Christian hope is rooted in faith in salvation in Christ.  The psalm echoes this hope and trust.  Every seed is planted in the hope it'll grow.  Jesus offers two analogies for the Kingdom: yeast and mustard seed.  As yeast leavens bread and increases its size, the Kingdom will expand us beyond what we can imagine.  The mustard seed is small, but its bush is impressively large.  "Hope is the ability to hear the music of the future.  Faith is the courage to dance to it today" (Kuzmic).
      Mustard bush
    • Passionist:   Fr. Pennington's centering prayer workshop transformed my prayer and changed my life.  I came to realize the goal of prayer wasn’t gleaning insights, realigning my moral attitude, or attaining a peaceful state; it was just being with God.  We can avoid prayer simply because of a faulty notion of what prayer is supposed to be.  Paul tells us that our groaning, disillusionment, fuzzy thinking, tears, and frustrated hopes can all be prayer.  How liberating to realize I don’t have to have answers.  If I'm confident of God’s presence, I can leave my prayer open-ended, and the Spirit helps in my weakness.
    • DailyScripture.net:  "What God's kingdom is like":  The mustard seed grows to a tree that attracts birds because they love its seeds.  Similarly, God's kingdom starts small in receptive hearts, works unseen, and transforms.  As leaven (with heat) transforms dough to wholesome bread, staple of life, God's kingdom transforms those who receive new life in Christ.  When we yield, the Spirit transforms us.